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Cory Polish
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Welcome
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What is Piano Price Point?

Piano Price Point is an information-only website aimed at helping you, the consumer make educated decisions about pianos. We don’t sell pianos. In fact, we don’t even give opinions about pianos as we believe that your taste regarding musical instruments is subjective. Piano Price Point gathers information direct from manufacturers ~ pictures, specifications, MSRP (manufacturer’s suggested retail price), components, dimensions & finishes. We then organized the pianos by price into 10 upright chapters and 14 grand chapters. Since MSR prices are usually somewhat inflated, feel free to browse higher than your budget knowing that the pianos will often be less expensive in stores.
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In addition to our piano chapters, check out our Find-A-Tuner section to find a local piano technician. We also have a monthly Piano Blog where you can read exciting articles and compelling interviews about the latest news in piano manufacturing. We hope you enjoy reading through the pages of Piano Price Point.
~ kind regards, Glen Barkman
GAP
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Grand American Piano

Grand American Piano

TOC Main
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TOC Uprights

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Upright Piano Index

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1+++++Upright Pianos Priced Below $4,999

2+++++Upright Pianos Priced Between $5,000 - $5,499

3+++++Upright Pianos Priced Between $5,500 - $5,999

4+++++Upright Pianos Priced Between $6,000 - $6,999

5+++++Upright Pianos Priced Between $7,000 - $8,999

6+++++Upright Pianos Priced Between $9,000 - $11,999

7+++++Upright Pianos Priced Between $12,000 - $14,999

8+++++Upright Pianos Priced Between $15,000 - $19,999

9+++++Upright Pianos Priced Between $20,000 - $29,999

10+++++Upright Pianos Priced Between $30,000 - & Up

TOC Grands

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Grand Piano Index

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1+++++Grand Pianos Priced Below $10,999

2+++++Grand Pianos Priced Between $11,000 - $12,999

3+++++Grand Pianos Priced Between $13,000 - $14,999

4+++++Grand Pianos Priced Between $15,000 - $16,999

5+++++Grand Pianos Priced Between $17,000 - $20,999

6+++++Grand Pianos Priced Between $21,000 - $25,999

7+++++Grand Pianos Priced Between $26,000 - $34,999

8+++++Grand Pianos Priced Between $35,000 - $44,999

9+++++Grand Pianos Priced Between $45,000 - $54,999

10+++++Grand Pianos Priced Between $55,000 - $64,999

11+++++Grand Pianos Priced Between $65,000 - $79,999

12+++++Grand Pianos Priced Between $80,000 - $99,999

13+++++Grand Pianos Priced Between $100,000 - $139,999

14+++++Grand Pianos Priced Between $140,000 & Up

Model Index



Console Piano
Studio Piano
Professional Upright Piano
Professional Large Upright
Baby Grand Piano
Medium Grand Piano
Large Grand Piano
Extra Large Grand Piano
Semi Concert Grand Piano
Concert Grand Piano

Manufacturer Index






Piano Blog
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Welcome to the Piano Price Point Blog. For those unfamiliar with the term "blog", it is the shortened version of "web-log". Blogs are usually a series of informally written articles. The purpose of this blog is to outline news and events from piano companies. Pianos are constantly being redesigned and changed. The intent of this blog is to give the "reader's digest" version summarizing the highlights of new releases and information of new designs. In addition, I quite often stumble upon facts about pianos that I find interesting in piano design. The table of contents will direct you to the appropriate article. Simply click on the article title to be redirected. I hope you enjoy and if you have any suggestions, please don't hesitate to add send a quick email on our contact page.

More Articles

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How Pianos Work
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How Pianos Work

Every piano page in Piano Price Point has a button marked More Information which details sales features. This chapter is designed to help broaden your knowledge and understanding of what manufacturers are selling as benefits of their pianos. For the purpose of organization, the piano components have been divided into 6 major sections. There are many overlaps in relation to sound and function but for simplicity sake, they are as follows:

Hammers
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Hammers

Chapter Index

Piano hammersThe hammers strike the strings of the piano like mallets. Each note has a different sized hammer. Larger ones are used to excite larger strings and are located on the left side of the keyboard while smaller ones strike the high notes at the right side of the piano. Hammers are made from sheep’s wool and there are many grades and kinds of wool. Virgin wool refers to fibers that have not been recycled and then reconstituted into new wool. Piano hammers are often double felted which generally is considered a higher grade of hammer (shown in red). Often terms of pounds are used to indicate the size and weight of hammers which refers to the initial sheet of wool before cutting. 14lb hammers are ‘lighter’ while 16 – 18 lb hammers are ‘weightier’. Note that many of the piano makers produce their own hammers in their factories while others import hammers from specialists. Within each of the specialist companies there are also grades of hammers. For example Renner sells their “premium blue” as Piano Hammers2part of a series of hammers. Hammers are often reinforced by staples or “T-wires” to ensure they don’t come apart from the molding. The center wooden part of the hammer is called the molding. Traditionally they have been made from walnut, mahogany or hornbeam.

Independent hammer name brands:

German: Renner, Abel, FFW, VFG, Weikert, Bacon, Wurzen
Japan: Imadegawa
American: Ronson
Other: Royal George (Originally UK… now?)

Strings
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Strings

Chapter Index

Treble stringsThere are two types of strings on any piano. The treble plain steel wire makes up approximately the top 2/3 of the piano strings while the bass strings comprise the lowest 1/3 of the piano. Each note in the treble has three strings (tri-chord) while the bass has a mix of 2 strings (bi-chord) or 1 string per note (mono-chord). Bass strings are made from wrapping copper wire around a core of steel. Without question the most popular high grade plain wire comes from Röslau, Germany. Regarding bass strings however, there are several independent makers and many of the manufacturers wrap their own bass strings. There are also independent companies that manufacture custom sets of bass strings. The scale or design of strings - the length, thickness and tension are critical elements in what is perceived as the voice or signature from each manufacturer.

Independent piano wire names:

Bass strings

German: Röslau steel, Degen copper, Adolf
Japan: Suzuki
USA: Mapes

Bridges
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Bridges

Chapter Index

Piano bridgeIf you’ve ever played guitar, you’ll be aware of the importance of the bridge. The bridge is the transfer point of vibration from the strings to the soundboard. Why is this considered a sound producing element? In my mind I think of the bridge as not so much creating tone but as having the ability to drastically alter sound. If the transfer of vibration is inhibited, the overall piano tone can be dull, “thunky” or choked. Due to the nature and shape of piano bridges, some believe that it is cost prohibitive to build them out of one piece. Also, because there are approximately 18 tons of string tension on any piano, most makers have reinforced the bridges with a cross laminated piece called a cap. In more recent years, manufacturers have made vertically laminated bridges which in a sense act like sound ‘tubes’ transferring the sound through strips of wood. Still others make horizontally laminated bridges like layers. The term “cantilevered” refers to bridges that are shaped in such a way as to optimize placement and Vertically laminated bridgepressure on the soundboard. Often layers are added or areas are cut away so that the contact area is optimized on the soundboard. Hand-notched bridges refer to the point where the string is terminated at the bridge pins. In order to vibrate freely, accuracy in the bridge notch is of extreme importance. Traditionally bridges are made from beech or maple. Some makers also incorporate mahogany and even ebony. Most bridges are made in the factory and there are no associated independent name brands for bridges.

Soundboard
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Soundboard

Chapter Index

Piano soundboardThe soundboard on a piano is the large sheet of wood which acts as a transducer transforming vibration into sound. The purpose of a soundboard is to make audible the signal created by the hammers striking the strings, transferred through the bridges. The soundboard is put under compression (not tension) and creates what is called ‘crown’, a slightly arced shape. Without question, the most talked about area and quite often the difference in cost between models has to do with the soundboard of a piano. Piano makers are offering solid versus laminated soundboards. Please note that there are many different terms being associated with laminated soundboards (such as triphonic, meniscus, surface-tension or veneered). For the purpose of clarity, if a piano soundboard has more than one layer, I have called it laminated because that is what it is: 2 or more layers glued together to produce one soundboard.
Among elite piano makers is the pursuit of clear, tight grained woods. Due to a shortage of slow growth timber, makers now are advertising high altitude or mountain spruce soundboards. The reasoning is this: higher altitude makes for colder, slower growth and thus tighter grain. Tighter grain is considered more resonant. Logging at high altitude however is costly and dangerous. Countries are often associated as well with types of wood (Austrian, Italian, Siberian, Bavarian and Canadian). The most common wood for soundboards is spruce and most companies manufacture in-house.

Independent soundboard makers:

Canada: Bolduc
Germany: Strunz

Ribs & Rim
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Ribs & Rim

Chapter Index

Piano soundboard 2Grand piano rim
Ribs are attached to the under side of the soundboard and act as support for the crown. They also transfer tone perpendicular to the soundboard grain and secure the joints of the soundboard. The rim is the perimeter frame to the soundboard. Piano makers quite often advertise amount of ribs and whether they are notched to the inner rim denoting structural and acoustic cohesion. Philosophy on rim construction and materials vary greatly from maker to maker. Some have one continuous rim while others build it in pieces. The construction and components are company decisions and diversity in design varies from piano to piano. These parts are made in-house and there are no independent makers of rims and ribs advertised by manufacturers. There are instances however where piano makers will purchase ‘strung backs’ for uprights which include soundboard, frame, strings, and rim.

Iron harp or plate
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Iron Plate or Harp

Chapter Index

Piano cast iron plateConsider that the modern piano has between 17 and 25 tons of string tension depending on the maker. The piano then needs to have a structure to support such tension. It is necessary to incorporate a framework to create not only tuning stability but also a rigid rim to the diaphragm of the soundboard.

The iron plate is often the gold colored piece located on the inside of the piano. There are mainly two streams of thinking regarding the iron frame: sand cast or V-pro. Sand cast refers to the age old method of placing the mold into wet sand and then pouring molten iron into the hollowed space. V-Pro refers to Vacuum Process which sucks the iron into precision molds and requires very little if any finishing. Traditional sand cast is somewhat laborious to finish. Some manufacturers have taken the tack of sand casting with CNC finishing (Computer Numerically Controlled a.k.a. computerized lathe). Decisions regarding casting are philosophical but are also driven by economics. V-Pro is very costly to set up and prohibits boutique piano makers from involvement in that process. Though some would argue that the casting and cooling methods are superior from one method to another, iron is relatively inert and musical contributions are negligible to the sound of the piano. Its primary purposes are rigidity and stiffness. Albeit more obscure but still noteworthy is the introduction to steel by some makers into mainstream manufacturing having a higher tensile strength than iron. Most iron plates are cast either in-house or purchased between piano makers.

Frame and Keybed
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Frame and Key Bed

Chapter Index

Piano key bedKeybed: The keybed refers to the frame beneath the piano keys. Piano manufacturing requires not only stability but also accuracy as it relates to the keybed. If the keybed is not ‘true’, that means then that the action parts that are supported by the keybed will also be out of alignment. Subsequently for structural integrity, some manufacturers advertise a laminated keybed or a butcher block style keybed. Most often they are made from spruce or beech wood. Some manufacturers have also reinforced the keybed with a steel frame.

Frame: The frame of the piano aids the cast iron plate in structural integrity. Piano frameUnderneath a grand piano you will see beams. On the back of an upright piano these beams are referred to as back posts. Generally speaking, more beams equates to greater strength, stability and soundboard crown retention. Configuration and greater number of beams are considered sales advantages and part of each company’s manufacturing design. Some manufacturers have also incorporated steel to aid structural integrity into the framework.

Tuning Pins & Pinblock
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Tuning Pins & Pinblock

Chapter Index

Piano tuning pinblock

Tuning pins: The tuning pins on any piano are made from steel. They are a structural element in so far as the pins hold the string tension in place without which the piano would not be able to be tuned. Fine thread is cut on the tuning pins and they are usually reverse threaded so as to not come undone under pressure. Plating of pins (either in nickel, chrome or ‘blue’) prevent rust.

Independent tuning pin makers:
German: Klinke

Pinblock or Wrestplank: The tuning pins fit into holes precisely drilled into a plank called the pinblock or wrestplank (“wrest” similar to “wrench” means to turn, thus the wrestplank is the block of wood where one would wrest the tuning pins). Modern piano makers all agree that multi-laminate layers make for the best pinblocks. Piano tuning pinsWhat differentiates them is the amount of layers. Some have 7 laminations while others have 19 however more is not necessarily better. They are usually made from a dense wood such as maple or beech. It is located under the gold cast iron plate and usually hidden from plain view. Many pinblocks are made in the factory.

Independent pinblock makers:

Germany: Delignit
American: Berkel
Canadian: Bolduc

Mechanical: Action
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Action

Chapter Index

Grand piano actionThe action of a piano is the mechanical system of levers that transfer the touch of a piano key to the strike of the hammer towards the string. In order to create sufficient power at the piano, each action has an “action ratio” that in effect multiplies the force of the key to the hammers. If each note requires upwards of 60 parts multiplied by 88 notes on the piano, each piano action then contains about 5,000 parts. What is referred to as the ‘touch’ of a piano is directly related to the action of a piano. The control at your finger tips to make a piano louder or softer occurs in the action. Subsequently, the design, the components and the consistency in manufacturing of the action are equally critical to the sound producing elements of the piano. Types and styles of actions are as wide spread as there are types of engines in cars. With the introduction of computer assisted design (CAD) however, piano actions have consolidated considerably over several decades. The weight and subsequent balance of piano hammers, the ratio of the whippen assembly (intricate lever system), the length of the keys, and the materials for all parts have a bearing into the overall picture of how the piano will play. Some manufacturers have incorporated the use of synthetic parts while others have held fast to more traditional components. Pictured is the side profile of a grand piano action while on the following page is an action from an upright piano.

Independent action makers:

Germany: Renner
Czech Republic: Detoa
USA: Wessel, Nickel & Gross

Action page2
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Action cont.

Chapter Index

Upright piano actionPiano Actions Continued

1. Component material, usually out of a more dense wood like maple or hornbeam. New materials such as ABS carbon fiber are also being used.

2. Action rail is the common rail that holds hammers, shanks and flanges securely in place, usually made out of extruded aluminum or dense wood such as maple or beech.

3. Action brackets – these are structural frame pieces that attach the action to the piano body. Generally more brackets are considered better for structural integrity.

4. Type of action – both “compressed” actions (miniature) and “drop” actions (for uprights shorter than 39”) have been eliminated from modern manufacturing and only “direct blow” actions remain as standard in both grand and upright pianos.

5. Action name – many manufacturers name their own actions in hopes of having a sales advantage but of greater consideration is the components.

Outsourcing of action parts has been going on for decades (almost centuries) where piano companies will build the frame, soundboard and strings and then have a piano specialist company to build actions. That said, there are many piano companies continue to build high quality actions in-house.

Keys
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Keys

Chapter Index

Piano keysThe piano keys are most often made out of spruce with a variety of keytop materials. In 1975, the use of elephant ivory was banned by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES). Since then a variety of substances have been developed for key surfaces. Most common is plastic for the use of keytops but other makers have gone to great lengths to simulate the porous feel of ivory. Names such as ivorine, ivorite, neotex, polyplex, ivoplast, and Piano keytopsPMMA (Poly methyl methacrylate) are all used as advertising features of high grade keytops. Boutique makers attempting to remain organic also use cow bone as replacement for ivory. The black keys are manufactured out of either dense wood or plastic but some have used traditional ebony for the keytops.
The spruce keys usually are “balanced” or “weighted”. This means that lead weights have been inserted into the wood of the keys to help balance the feel of the action.

Independent piano key makers:

Germany: Kluge, Laukhuff

Pedals
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Pedals

Chapter Index

Piano pedalsModern pianos are equipped with three pedals. The right pedal is known as the sustain or damper pedal. When a note is depressed on the keyboard, the felt touching the string called the damper block is lifted up allowing the note to vibrate freely. When your finger releases the note, the damper drops down again and mutes the string. The sustain pedal lifts all the dampers simultaneously allowing the tone to continue to resound regardless of whether the note has been released at the key. The left pedal is commonly called the soft pedal. It is also referred to as the 'una corda' on grands. Grand pianos and uprights operate very differently. On a grand piano, the entire keyboard shifts from left to right making the hammers strike on 'fresh felt'. In addition, one string (una corda) is not struck by the hammers and so it becomes a quieter, more intimate tone. Due to the physical constraints of upright construction, it is not possible to have an una corda pedal. The hammers are moved closer to the strings and in essence create a sort of soft pedal because the strike point is closer. It acts more like volume limiter by reducing the amount of maximum volume achieved with a reduced strike distance. The center pedal, however has a variety of functions from sostenuto (selective sustain), bass damper (just lifting the bass dampers) or practice mute (also called attenuator pedal which drops a piece of felt in between the strings and the hammers). Some have also been set up to act as a ‘quiet play’ digital piano which blocks the hammers from striking the strings and the piano can then be used with headphones. The connecting rods and levers are called the pedal assembly or trapwork. These are made from either aluminum tubing, steel, solid brass or wood. The pedals are made from cast brass but have also been manufactured out of steel and plated with either chrome, nickel or brass.

Design Concepts
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Design Concepts

Chapter Index

Piano agraffeThough not specifically mechanical in nature, there are certain design elements that re-occur in piano advertising:

1.Agraffe and Capo bar

2.Duplex or triplex (double duplex) and Aliquot

Agraffe comes from the French word “staple” meaning to fasten. On a piano, an agraffe is a small solid brass piece threaded into the cast iron plate. Piano duplexingThe strings are fed through the holes and fastened to ensure correct positioning of height and string spacing as well as establishing precise “speaking length” of the string. It is more commonly found on grand pianos than uprights. Capo D’Astro bar or simply capo bar is what is called a pressure bar and is used in place of agraffes. It is a bar made from steel and then nickel or chrome plated.

Duplex design means that there is a secondary sympathetic vibration of the string found after the bridge termination. Historically, the speaking length of any string ended after the bridge pins but in 1872, Theodore Steinway made this portion ‘live’ to resonate with the speaking length through bars called aliquots. The word aliquot means a ‘smaller portion of the whole’. Aliquot bars or aliquot strings (a 4th string on each note) excite harmonic frequencies. Today, some manufacturers have not only tuned the end part of the aliquots but also the front, making it a double duplex (also called triplex).

Hardware
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Hardware

Chapter Index

Piano hardware

Hardware on a piano refers to functional or connective pieces usually made out of some sort of metal. Most of the pianos use solid brass hardware. Some have created a different look by nickel or chrome plated hardware. Hardware includes hinges, casters, pedals, screws, locks and lock plates. Brass has been the metal of choice primarily because it doesn’t readily deteriorate (tarnish or rust), is an easy metal to work with and is relatively affordable.

Piano hardware 2

Cosmetics & Styling
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Cosmetics & Style

Chapter Index

Piano finishingUnderstanding the outside finish of a piano requires a little knowledge of the construction process. Pianos are made from layers. The center core of body panels is known as the substrate. The lid, the rim, the side panels all have this substrate. Substrates are structural and consist quite often of layers of wood or MDF. On top of the substrate are glued the decorative pieces of wood called veneers. (see next page for more on veneers) Most popular by all piano companies is the mirror finish called polished ebony (also known as high polish ebony or "bright" ebony). Finally, the finish (also called the clear coat) seals in the wood and brings about varying degrees of luster. Sheen is determined by either hand rubbing a finish or using satin sprays. Finish can be thin and give the sensation that you feel like you’re touching the wood of the piano (also known as open-pore finish) but can also be thick like glass. Within the last 4 decades, polyester resin has become the “high shine” black that is so prevalent on most pianos. There still exist however lacquer and shellac finishes especially on custom designs and veneers. Creating the perfect “piano finish” requires great skill, tools and dust free environments. In the age of automation, many of the finishes are robotically applied.

Changing the look of a piano can be as simple as changing the legs. Replacing the standard square legs for round considerably changes the look of a piano. Over the years, furniture styles have been also applied to pianos. Most popular are Queen Anne and Louis XV or even Rococo styles. Finally, inlays of differing types of woods is also common. Walnut for example with a burled walnut inlay is popular. What appears to be trendy is high polish black with a wood inlay.

Wood Veneers
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Veneers

Chapter Index

Veneers come from many different types of trees and are cut in such a way that they display the most beautiful figure or grain of the wood. Veneers are usually only about as thick as cardboard and are used to greatly enhance the look of the piano. Common veneers are mahogany and walnut. Rosewood, macassar, and yew have become more recently in vogue. Ebony, although an actual type of wood is the term used for “black” piano finish (shown on previous page). Some companies will advertise “dark walnut” or “medium walnut” or “brown mahogany” or “red mahogany”. To enhance the grain of the wood, the wood is treated with a color layer called dye or stain. It is then covered and sealed with clear finish to enhance the grain and bring out the lustre.

Piano wood color options

Find-a-tuner
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Please click on one of the following areas to find a piano tuner

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Published by PianoHQ.com Publishing

Copyright 2012

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Disclaimer of Liability and Endorsement

PianoPricePoint.com has used reasonable efforts in collecting, preparing and providing quality information and material, but does not warrant or guarantee the accuracy, completeness, adequacy or currency of the information contained in or linked to these Web Sites. Users of information from these Web Sites or links do so at their own risk. Any reference made by PianoPricePoint.com to any specific commercial product, process, or service (or provider of such product, process or service) other than of PianoPricePoint.com by trade name, trademark, hyperlink, or otherwise, does not constitute or imply an endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by PianoPricePoint.com. Content on PianoPricePoint.com may be provided by third parties and users. Any opinions, advice, statements, services, offers or other information expressed or made available by third parties, including information providers, users or others, are those of the respective author(s) or distributor(s) and do not necessarily state or reflect those of PianoPricePoint.com. To the extent that this website contains links to outside services and resources, PianoPricePoint.com does not control the availability and content of those outside services and resources. Any concerns regarding any such service or resource, or any link thereto, should be directed to the particular service or resource.

Words from the Author ~ History
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Here’s a challenge: name a dozen piano brands. Over the years when I’ve randomly asked customers that question, they’re stumped after about five. The Pierce Piano Atlas, an excellent resource for tracking serial numbers and dates lists 12,000 names of pianos! The world of piano manufacturing was different 150 years ago. Without television or radio, the piano was the center of home entertainment. Subsequently, there were hundreds of local piano manufacturers around the world.
Upon closer examination, however it’s apparent that there were not 12,000 piano manufacturers but rather upwards of 1,000 piano makers “stencilling” names of 12,000 pianos. Stencilling began as consolidation where one company would purchase another and then instead of marketing just one company, they would market two names of pianos. Bigger fish ate up smaller fish for the purposes of efficiency and market share. It made sense then to build different names and brands of pianos under one roof utilizing the same resources, infrastructure and expertise. Names, either fabricated or real became the trademark for credibility.
During the 20th century these piano companies weathered two world wars, the great depression, the industrial age and finally the advent of computerization. Instead of hundreds of piano companies we are left with approximately 60 well known brands.
Words from the Author ~ 20th Century
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Manufacturing has now entered a state of dualism where there are giant companies manufacturing tens of thousands of pianos annually and conversely hand crafted boutique makers are producing a few hundred of highly priced instruments. With computer assisted design (CAD) and globalization of knowledge and expertise, companies have responded by making pianos and piano parts in all corners of the world. The most notable trend is manufacturing with cost effective labor. Many companies have altered and/or abandoned their own manufacturing plants in favor of building in countries such as Indonesia or China where cheaper labor equates into more competitive and affordable prices. Still others are holding fast the traditional ways of piano making but the trade-off is that these pianos are higher priced comparatively.
Piano Price Point is the compilation of years of analysis, tracking which of these pianos are current. The objective is to analyze and compare all of the models of pianos in the world. With over 700 models each piano page in Piano Price Point contains pictures, specifications, prices and features as advertised by the manufacturer. It’s like having all of the brochures of all the pianos available at a glance. These approximately 60 names produce an estimated 90% of the world’s pianos.
My goal is to educate you, the consumer with possibilities, enabling you to make educated decisions. The specifications are accurate. It is my hope that you enjoy this pictorial reference guide. Scroll down and look carefully at the features and make informed purchasing decisions. I give this without prejudice, opinion or bias. Enjoy!
~ Glen Barkman
Words from the Author ~ Criteria
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Careful consideration was made when determining the insertion of each piano company into this book. Piano Price Point has analyzed only new pianos. Vintage or obsolete companies that are no longer in business have not been included. Pianos represented have intentional design, musical acceptance, sales and support infrastructure. The following are general criteria to be included in the pages of Piano Price Point:

They must be in business today. This book is not about the pianos of yesteryear but modern manufacturing of new instruments.

They must have global presence. The company must have a website and contact information.


They must provide a set MSRP (Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price list of all models).As a side note: please be aware that the prices listed are the BASE for each model in USD$. The base model usually comes in black. Rather than having an entire book of black pianos, the picture corresponding to any model is one chosen for both beauty and to create variety. By pressing the page down button on any page you will find the full list of finishes available.


Technical data and pictures must be made available for every model included.

Words from the Author ~ Prices
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Just a word regarding prices: The MSRP (Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price) of any piano is usually higher than you will find in stores. Why? For two reasons: One is that it presents an inflated value of the instrument. Psychologically consumers then feel they are getting a great deal on a piano when it goes "on sale". Two, it's the safest publishable global price that can be printed without stepping on toes. What do I mean by that? Let's say you have a widget company that makes products in Japan. Companies that ship to North America also need to factor in shipping and warehousing into their pricing. As well, retail space in New York or Paris for owning a piano store will be much different than a small shop in a rural town. Subsequently, the piano makers set a "safe" price on their pianos - a price that is cushioned to offset costs.
While I don't begrudge retailers what they need to operate, this MSRP cushion has more to do with the former idea of presenting products with a high price to inflate inherent value. What does this all mean? Halfway through designing this book I realized that people will be shopping within a budget for a piano only to discover that prices are much lower in retail stores ~ usually 20-40% lower than MSRP. While there are some companies that give accurate reflections of price, most play it safe and present inflated values. When using this guide, therefore, shop higher than your budget, knowing that the prices in stores are lower. In this book, I would have preferred to use more realistic prices found in stores but the only benchmarks were price lists given me by the manufacturers. Although prices may vary from city to city, country to country, the piano information is nonetheless factual.
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